South of France Paintings
Palace of the Popes, Avignon
St Paul de Vence
Fountain at Aix
Monsignior Picasso’s Chapel
Saint-Sauveur Cathedral Portal I
Saint-Sauveur Cathedral Portal II
St Peter, Aix-en-Provence I
St Peter, Aix-en-Provence II

Palace of the Popes, Avignon (Detail)
Drybrush Watercolour, 38 cm x 56 (15" x 22")
(Private Collection, Ontario)

Click on the titles or the detail
to view the whole painting.

St Paul de Vence (Detail)
Alkyd on Canvas, 77 cm x 107 cm (30" x 42")
(Private Collection, Ontario)

Click on the titles or the detail
to view the whole painting.

Fountain at Aix (Detail)
Alkyd and Watercolour, 56 cm x 76 cm (22" x 30")
(Private Collection, Ontario)

Click on the titles or the detail
to view the whole painting.

Monsignior Picasso’s Chapel (Detail)
Drybrush Watercolour, 56 cm x 38 cm (22" x 15")
(Private Collection, New York)

Click on the titles or the detail
to view the whole painting.

Saint-Sauveur Cathedral Portal I (Detail)
Watercolour, 104 cm x 74 cm (41" x 29 1/2")
(Private Collection, Ontario)

Click on the titles or the detail
to view the whole painting.

Saint-Sauveur Cathedral Portal II (Detail)
Watercolour, 104 cm x 74 cm (41" x 29 1/2")
(Private Collection, Ontario)

Click on the titles or the detail
to view the whole painting.

St Peter, Aix-en-Provence I (Detail)
Watercolour, 56 cm x 38 cm (22" x 15")
(Private Collection, Ontario)

Click on the titles or the detail
to view the whole painting.

St Peter, Aix-en-Provence II (Detail)
Watercolour, 76 cm x 56 cm (30" x 22")
(Private Collection, Ontario)

Click on the titles or the detail
to view the whole painting.

The South of France Series (1997–2000)

Exploring the heritage of some of the ideas he was exploring in his Window Series, the artist travelled in 1997 to the south of France to see the landscape that had been inhabited by so many of the major modernists, especially Paul Cézanne (1839-1906). Once he got there, he was struck by several visual features, each of which is explored in this suite of paintings. The first was the presence of Roman architecture, its massiveness and repose; he identified this monumentality as a contributor to Cubism. It also furthered his conviction that Cézanne was a classicist, and therefore that Cubism could be understood as a form of twentieth-century neoclassicism. Several of the South of France paintings, notably the paintings of The Palace of the Popes, Avignon and the townscape of St Paul de Vence, explore neoclassical effects. The medieval inheritance of the region provided a counterpart which he saw as the other half of Cubism: strong graphic outlines, close-ups, radical perspective shifts. These effects are the focus of the Aix cathedral series, which can be viewed in the Current Work section of this site.